Top Diet and Lifestyle Measures to Ward Off Heart Disease

A heart health doctor stressing the importance of healthy diet and exercise to ward off heart disease

The so-called “silent killer” is tricky 

Heart disease is tricky. Most often, you might have a heart attack and not even know about it. The so-called “silent attack” accounts for 45% of heart attacks that are simply missed. 

What’s more, even the dull pain that somebody might assume coming from a strenuous exercise across the chest is often an early warning sign of an unhealthy heart. 

And if you’re a woman, the odds of not experiencing any pain during a heart attack is most likely possible, considering less than 40% of women actually complaining of pain during a heart attack. 

But, it all boils down to one thing – making the right choices! 

Preventing heart disease is not as daunting as it seems. 

It could be as simple as understanding that when you add ranch, some extra eggs, and a bunch of cheese to your salad, all you did is turn the salad into a cheeseburger!

So don’t miss a beat and,

Check out our top diet and lifestyle measures to ward off heart disease. 

First up – time to “rethink” the way we eat our diet.

Obesity is one of the leading causes of heart disease, and it is only growing. Australia is rising faster than anywhere else in the obesity rate.

And it is not just consuming a diet rich in processed food, but also how our diet has changed over the years. With really high levels of sugar and fats in our food, it is only the tip of the iceberg. 

Here in home, Victorians felt overeating was the new norm and that treats have become a part of our everyday life. 

Even those protein bars are high in added sugar, sodium, saturated and trans fats. 

The way forward is to definitely eat a good portion of your veggies and fruits every day. Spend time doing online research on food and diet and keep it simple. 

A GP carrying a bowl of fruits and vegetables for a heart healthy diet, Epping Doctors

Some takeaway heart-healthy diet tips 

1) Mediterranean Diet 

A Mediterranean diet is abundant in minimally processed food, rich in monounsaturated fats, and a healthy portion of meat and dairy products. 

It emphasises eating more greens, and seasonal fruits and veggies. Includes low-fat poultry, meat, nuts, and olive oil and limits aged sugar, beverage, highly processed food, and processed meats.

2) Fatty fish 

Did you know that eating at least two servings of fatty fish in your weekly diet could reduce your risk for heart disease? Salmon, mackerel, tuna and sardines are chock-full of omega-3 fatty acids.

3) Reduce salt by half 

Given, an estimated 1.2 million Australian adults have 1 or more conditions related to heart disease, reducing the consumption of salt will greatly help reduce the risks for heart disease. 

Currently, an average Australian consumes nearly double the recommended 5 grams a day, about 1 teaspoon a day. 

Let’s change the way we live our life

A woman athlete in track for a sprint, for keeping herself active

Sedentary behaviour and physical inactivity are among the leading modifiable risk factors for heart diseases, if not worsening many other chronic conditions that leads to heart disease. 

Take away tips

1) Exercise regularly  

Our doctors can’t stress enough the importance of being physically active. Regular exercise promotes sound health, helps maintain a healthy weight, provides the right mindset, and helps prevent many health issues. 

Studies have shown that even 30 minutes of daily exercise can help reduce heart disease’s leading risk factors. 

2) Limit alcohol consumption 

Whether it’s for celebration or a friend’s night out, alcohol is debatable even when done moderately. And in case you’re a heavy drinker, chances are that are already prone to heart disease,

Excessive alcohol consumption is linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart failure, and stroke.

We recommend if you choose to drink, then limit it to healthy levels.

Time to do a heart-health check? 

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